Happy New Year!

The Board Members of the Foundation for the History of Navy Medicine wish all persons involved in Navy Medicine and/or the history of Navy Medicine a wonderful and happy new year.  We look forward to a 2017 with greater activity for the Society, and we invite your participation and enthusiasm.   The picture below is symbolic of the mighty effort navy medicine entails, and its importance in human heritage and history.

Source: https://www.med-dept.com/articles/ww2-hospital-ships/

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Year end message!

Happy New Year,

The Society for the History of Navy Medicine wishes you a most wonderful and happy New Year!  We have had an eventful 2016.  This year our conference was held one again with the North American Society for Oceanic History (NASOH).  It occurred in Portland, Maine along with the Naval Historical Foundation and the North Atlantic Fisheries History Association.  We had a marvelous time and gave out our first Harold D. Langley Book Prize for Katherine Foxhall’s Health, Medicine and the Sea: Australian voyages c. 1815-1860 published by Manchester University Press in 2012.  Natalie Shibley from the University of Pennsylvania also won our graduate student travel award to participate in the conference.  Our Foundation for the History of Navy Medicine also met during the summer, and we were joined by two new board members, Dr. Kenneth J. Hagan, Professor of History and Strategy at institutions including the US Naval Academy, Naval Postgraduate School, and the Naval War College and Captain Joel Labow, from the Medical Corps, US Navy, retired.  Dr. Hagan and Captain Labow join me, Rear Admiral Frederic Sanford, Captain Thomas Snyder, Dr. Harold Langley and Captain Lee Mandel on the Foundation board.  Presently we are planning a joint conference for Spring 2018 with the Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage focused on Medicine and World War I.  It will be held in San Antonio, Texas, and you’ll hear much more about this conference beginning this spring.

We look forward to an active and happy 2017.  Please consider a tax deductible year end contribution, if possible to fund graduate student travel and research grants. And finally, send us your news.  We like hearing from our members: acroswhi@odu.edu.

Happy New Year,

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Ph.D., Executive Director

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It’s that time of year! Happy 2017.

Dear Society Members,

On New Year’s Eve is coming; please consider making a tax deductible contribution to the Society for the History of Navy Medicine.  All monies go to very good causes such as funding our graduate student travel award and graduate student research award.

A small contribution of just $30 might seem insignificant, but in the big picture, it helps to get our graduate students to our conferences. You may not be aware of this, but as universities have become more corporate entities (as is the trend throughout the United States), fellowships and tuition waivers are being reduced or cancelled.   In fact, at my University, tuition waivers don’t exist anymore for graduate students in my college as they did a decade ago.  This means graduate students have to pay their own tuition out of their very small stipends.   This situation may not be true for graduate students at the top-tier universities, but overall the last ten years have seen universities reduce graduate student stipends and tuition waivers just as faculty salaries have stayed stagnant or in many cases have also been reduced.  And it is worse for graduate students because  the cost of living has increased tremendously.  Many graduate student have to resort to student loans to offset small stipends, and many do not have any healthcare at all.  This is the world we now live in today in Higher Education.

So please, think about making this contribution, today.  We are planning a fantastic conference for 2018 focused on World War I, and I would like to get a whole panel of graduate students there if possible.  Conferences are marvelous venues to network and to learn more about professionalism within an academic environment and of course, to share intellectual ideas.

Thank you in advance, if you are able to support our Society, and in particular, our graduate students.  All you have to do is go to the Society main page at: https://historyofnavymedicine.org/contribute/ and hit contribute.  That will take you to our “donate” button.  All contributions are tax deductible.

Respectfully,

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Ph.D., Executive Director

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Happy Thanksgiving

Greetings to all Society members; I hope our post finds you well this Thanksgiving and enjoying all the day has to offer.  For this post, I thought I would pull a letter from the past.  The short excerpt below comes from a former sailor who served in World War II and reflects on Thanksgiving and those who sacrificed their lives to defeat the Axis powers.

Cliff Sampson of Plymouth, US Navy 1942- 1945 :
“My first military Thanksgiving was in 1942 at Great Lakes. We had a big mess hall and it was a typical Thanksgiving dinner with turkey and all the fixings, apple pie and mince pie.
They tried to make it special and, of course, everybody was hepped [sic] on the war.
Just being a little recruit, you didn’t have much to say about it anyhow, you just did what they told you and ate what they gave you. But it was good food, I can’t complain.
Some of the food probably was better than a lot of people ever had before they were in the service. Some people came from poverty…
Thanksgiving 1945 I was home in Plymouth with my family and my wife. We were getting ready to settle down and I was back to work, running the store again. It was a great feeling to be home, after being blown up on a ship in July (the USS YMS 84 yard mind sweeper was blown up 3 July 1945, Cliff Sampson received the Purple Heart) and then in November, I’m out of the service and the war is over.
I feel sorry for all those that didn’t come back. It was a great experience, but it’s
too bad for those who had to leave us. They fought for a great cause.”
The excerpt comes to us from the “Pilgrim Hall Museum” in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
Thanks to all who are serving and who have served.
Annette Finley-Croswhite, Ph.D., Executive Director, Society for the History of Navy Medicine
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Honoring Veterans Day

Hello Society Members,

I want to honor all veterans today, especially those who are our Society members.  As something different, I thought today we might honor in particular my 89-ear old father who is a veteran of World War II, Rev. Clyde Lee Finley.  I think he has an interesting history that unites the history of the US Navy with the history of medicine.  Read on!

Joining the Navy changed everything for my father, who grew up a poor boy in a southern cotton mill town in northern Alabama.  On March 17, 1944, he convinced his mother to walk him down to the local recruitment office to join the US Navy.  Because he was only 17, he had to have his parent’s permission.  In fact, it was his 17th birthday.

Soon my father was on a train for San Diego and eventually assigned to the USS Savo Island (CVE-78).  His first engagement with war was the Peleliu Island landings followed soon thereafter by the famous Battle of Leyte Gulf.  Other engagements included Mindanao, Lingayen Gulf and the invasion of Okinawa.  On the day the Japanese surrendered, my father was one of 50 men selected from his ship to take over the Ominapo Naval Base in Honshu.  From there the Savo Island joined the Magic Carpet Fleet to ferry men home from the war.  Arriving in Boston on March 16, 1946…almost two years to the day from his enlistment, my father was discharged and returned home.

So Clyde Finley was part of that great generation that defeated fascism.  He entered a time and economy that made his short naval career a part of his success story.  My father quit high school at 14.  But he was given high school credit for serving it the war and was awarded his GED after 6 months of night school.  From there he went to college and graduate school, thanks to the GI Bill, and spent his career as a Protestant minister serving churches for over fifty years in Alabama, Kentucky, West Virginia, and for most of his career, Virginia.

My father was a fantastic storyteller, and he still recounts stories of the war.  There’s one about a kamikaze plane that grazed his ship, and another about a critical experience on a 40 millimeter gun.  But the most famous one is the story of his appendix.  This is where the history of Navy medicine becomes relevant!  The story goes…during battle my father passed out and was found unconscious.  Taken to sick bay he was operated on for a ruptured appendix.  During the operation a new drug was used, penicillin!!!  The doctor who operated on him told him that the drug had saved his life.  Penicillin became available to the armed forces in 1943 during the war but wasn’t available on the market until 1947.

I hope this Veterans Day finds all of our Veterans enjoying the day.  I hope they find time to reflect on what service did for them and how it shaped their character.  And I especially salute those Navy doctors who operated in extreme circumstances, and in this case, I honor the one who saved my father’s life.

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Ph.D., Executive Director, Society for the History of Navy Medicine

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Clyde Finley at 17

 

 

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Reminder: Abstracts DUE: Date extension to September 23.

Call for Papers: Nashville, May 4-6, 2017

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 23

Society for the History of Navy Medicine Call for Papers

Society New Logo

This coming year the Society for the History of Navy Medicine plans to join the conference planned for May 4-6 in Nashville, Tennessee sponsored by the American Association for the History of Medicine.

If you are a faculty member or graduate student working on the history of maritime or navy medicine, please consider offering a paper.

Our Deadline for acceptance of abstracts is September 20, 2016 because we must then send them forward to the AAHM.  Please submit your abstract to the Society for the History of Navy Medicine and not the AAHM.  Your abstract will be forwarded to the AAHM from the SHNM.

Send abstracts to Dr. Annette Finley-Croswhite, Executive Director, Society for the History of Navy Medicine: acroswhi@odu.edu

Abstract: Must be 350 words with your name, title and institution as the heading.  Please include 3 key-words that describe your paper and 3 learning outcomes of the paper (not reflected in the 350 count).  Also include a short 2-page vita.

We offer a graduate student travel grant competition and the winner receives $750 in travel funding for the conference.

Remember, submit your abstract to acroswhi@odu.edu by September 20, 2016.

THE NEW DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 23!

For more on the AAHM meeting see:

http://www.histmed.org/meeting/nashville2017?_ga=1.222982747.1195099619.1470337893

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Call for Papers: Nashville, May 4-6, 2017

Society for the History of Navy Medicine Call for Papers

Society New Logo

This coming year the Society for the History of Navy Medicine plans to join the conference planned for May 4-6 in Nashville, Tennessee sponsored by the American Association for the History of Medicine.

If you are a faculty member or graduate student working on the history of maritime or navy medicine, please consider offering a paper.

Our Deadline for acceptance of abstracts is September 20, 2016 because we must then send them forward to the AAHM.  Please submit your abstract to the Society for the History of Navy Medicine and not the AAHM.  Your abstract will be forwarded to the AAHM from the SHNM.

Send abstracts to Dr. Annette Finley-Croswhite, Executive Director, Society for the History of Navy Medicine: acroswhi@odu.edu

Abstract: Must be 350 words with your name, title and institution as the heading.  Please include 3 key-words that describe your paper and 3 learning outcomes of the paper (not reflected in the 350 count).  Also include a short 2-page vita.

We offer a graduate student travel grant competition and the winner receives $750 in travel funding for the conference.

Remember, submit your abstract to acroswhi@odu.edu by September 20, 2016.

For more on the AAHM meeting see:

http://www.histmed.org/meeting/nashville2017?_ga=1.222982747.1195099619.1470337893

 

 

 

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